FAQ for New Donors

How can I give? What can I give?
Gift of Cash
A gift of cash is the easiest way to give. The donor receives a tax receipt for the full amount and enjoys the immediate satisfaction of seeing their gift "at work".

Gift of Securities
A gift of stocks or bonds is also fully tax receipted at fair market value and provides offsetting tax credits on any tax on capital gains.

Gift of Real Estate
A gift of real estate is fully tax receipted at fair market value of the property. The gift generates tax credits against any tax on capital gains.

Gift of Life Insurance
A gift of life insurance can create a large gift at a very reasonable cost. The donor simply names the Golden and District Community Foundation as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy and the donor receives a donation receipt for the policy's cash value, as well as any future premiums.

Gift of Property
Gifts may also be made from other financial vehicles, such as shares in privately held companies, debentures, royalty interests, or works of art. Tax receipts are issued for the fair market value of the gift.

Deferred Gifts

How can I give in the future?

A Bequest
A gift included in a donor's will is the easiest way and most common form of a deferred gift. The donor retains full control over his/her assets and the donor's estate receives the tax receipt. The estate will avoid any tax on capital gains.

Gifts of Insurance
By naming the Golden and District Community Foundation as the beneficiary of a life insurance policy, the donor can create a future gift while retaining full control of the policy. The Foundation can assist in structuring the terms of the will so that the proceeds of the policy will result in a tax credit for the donor's estate.

Gifts of Residual Interest
This type of gift can include real estate or works of art and involves an irrevocable future gift. The donor receives a tax receipt for the present value of the gift and the gift is not subject to probate. It is also possible to avoid tax on capital gains.

Charitable Remainder Trust
A gift of a charitable remainder trust is similar to "giving away the tree, but keeping the apples". The donor makes an irrevocable gift of principal, from which he/she receives the net income for life. The donor receives a tax receipt for the full present value of the gift and avoids probate on this portion of the estate. The donor also avoids tax on any associated capital gain.


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The Foundation will always accept gifts of your time. Community-minded individuals are invited to join our Advisory Committees:

• Management
• Grants
• Marketing
• Youth
• Fund Development
• Investment

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